SECRET SERVICE PROSTITUTION SCANDAL IS TYPICAL OF U.S. WAR ON MARIJUANA IN LATIN AMERICA

Rowdy agents partying with the locals. Disagreements over money. Cultural misunderstandings. It’s not just a Secret Service prostitution scandal. Welcome to the U.S. War on Marijuana.

U.S. agents and  1.3 billion U.S. dollars flow to Columbia every year to battle marijuana. At first, the militarization of the Columbian war on drugs was designed to combat the cocaine trade. But as cocaine has waned in popularity, and production has shifted to other countries, Columbia’s war on drugs has become a war on marijuana.

The Latin American countries can’t turn their back on U.S. military aid, and gazillions of US bucks Congress lavishes on them, but the Secret Service prostitution scandal shows why fighting marijuana production with US agents flood with US dollars will never work.

For the US soldiers, DEA and FBI agents, and private contractors, sent to Columbia, it’s a nice assignment. The US dollar still goes pretty far down there, plus housing and other perks make it a sweet duty assignment. Friendly locals also help.

But to the locals, the US agents will always be customers and never friends. They will take our money, but don’t embrace our goals.

Ultimately, they don’t care if kids in the US smoke weed or not, and why should they. But they do appreciate the billions of US dollars Colombians earn on marijuana sales.

Consider this: A pound of coffee grown in the foothills of Columbia brings $5 in New York. A pound of Columbian marijuana brings $2,000. That leave $1,995 available to anyone who can figure out a way to get it from Bogota to NYC. And if the economic reports are correct, someone has.

The Columbian economy grew 6% last year, and is on track to surpass Argentina as the second largest in a Latin America. Money from marijuana sales combines with money from Congress to fight marijuana to fuel this growth.



Categories: Marijuana Laws

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